Posts Tagged ‘ cloud seeding ’

Clean energy research lags behind military research

US Air Force Experimental Fighter Jet

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5559874/bill-gates-and-friends-urge-us-government-to-triple-energy-research-spend

This is a scandalous discrepancy when, as mentioned in the article, you consider that there will be nothing worth protecting in a few decades if our addiction to fossil fuels is not curbed.

Instead such funding should be diverted to investigating technology like cloud-seeding, solar-power generation, renewable energy grids or even beaming energy from the Moon. All of these options have to be more constructive than designing new and more effective ways of blowing things up. It seems to me that we already have so many effective and proven options for generating enough energy in a clean and sustainable way but the political will and ability to organise ourselves is what is lacking.

Cloud seeding ship

Geoengineering – should we or shouldn’t we?

If we, the population of the Earth, accept that climate change is happening, and not in a good way, then it stands to reason we would want to do something about it. The fact that very little is being done about it in a cohesive and collaborative way is a reflection of the fact that there are still many climate change sceptics out there scuttling any attempts to spend the vast sums on new clean infrastructure that we are going to need. The arguments against carbon-trading, capping of CO2 emissions, and reduction of dependence on fossil fuels seem to be never-ending. Most arguments relate to money and the reluctance to spend it on clean technology until man-made climate change is proven beyond all doubt. Unfortunately it is unlikely to ever be proven to their high standards and certainly not before it will be too late to do anything about it.

Climatologists talk about a tipping point in the global climate. A point where global temperatures rise high enough that the continual temperature increase becomes self-sustaining. This will happen when enough permafrost in the Arctic melts that methane stored there begins to be released causing further temperature increase and further melting and so on. If we get to that point then I believe it seriously will be too late to do anything about it.

Most of the sceptics’ arguments centre around an unwillingness to do anything which will impact on our lives directly, be it travelling less, replacing the car with the bus, replacing the bus with the bicycle, or consuming less energy at home or at work. Some of these things such as insulating one’s house receive a boost because they can save you money, but in most cases the payback period is very long creating more reluctance and indecision. And most governments appear unable to put in place consistent incentives which would encourage people to invest in such changes. For example, the Australian government was subsidising roof insulation but it was mismanaged and now it is cancelled. They were also subsidising solar panel installation, now they’re not. And there is no certainty or consistency around feed-in tariff legislation either so householders are unwilling to risk investing in solar panels when they can’t accurately predict what it is going to cost them.

So if we’re not going to do anything meaningful about reducing our climate change-causing activities, how about trying a new activity which could mitigate the impact of the activities we refuse to curtail? This activity is geoengineering – the concept of “deliberately manipulating the Earth’s climate to counteract the effects of global warming from greenhouse gas emissions” [Wikipedia].

A number of geoengineering concepts have been proposed and discussed and, in most cases, discounted on the basis that they would be too expensive, too uncertain, or simply impossible with our current technology. Examples are; releasing billions of tiny mirrors into the upper atmosphere to reflect the sun’s rays away; releasing dust to mimic the cooling effects of a volcano (probably unlikely given the recent travel disruption in Europe!); or building artificial “trees” that can absorb CO2. Recently another more practical and achievable option has been discussed – cloud seeding.

Cloud seeding ship

In this case special cloud-generating solar-powered ships would criss-cross the world’s oceans sucking up seawater and projecting it into the atmosphere as a fine mist, thus seeding white clouds. Done on a large enough scale there is reasonable certainty that this could actually have a measurable effect on the Earth’s temperature by reflecting the sun’s rays back into space. Now don’t get me wrong, this is still not going to be a cheap exercise. Studies indicate that it will cost around US$7 billion dollars to build 1,900 of these ships, the number required to halt global temperature increases according to their calculations. But hang on… yes, that is a large sum of money, but we are talking about saving the world as we (and all other species) know it, surely a cause worth investing in (even gambling on) a little. And to provide some perspective, Melbourne in Australia has recently spent US1 billion on a fancy new public transport ticketing system that doesn’t even work properly! (You’ll be experiencing more rants about this in future blogs…)

So if one city in the world can afford to waste US$1 billion dollars, how easily could all the countries in the world afford to fund a project together that could very likely guarantee our very existence (or at least make it more difficult for us to wipe ourselves out), for the paltry sum of US$7 billion? The best part is that this concept is scalable. It doesn’t have to all be built and launched at once giving scientists a chance to measure its success on a regional scale before going global. It is estimated that US$25 – 30 million would be enough to set up a test area of 10,000 square kilometres. The research group that are proceeding with this idea are Silver Lining (get it?) and they have had a bounce in the media due to a $300k contribution indirectly from Bill Gates who has provided about $4.5m to investigate climate cooling technologies.

Critics of this idea say that we shouldn’t be interfering with the weather or climate in this way as we are not certain what, if any, side-effects there will be. I am of the opinion that through industrialisation and economic growth we have already interfered with the climate and are seeing significant changes in the world’s weather patterns. This project should be considered as an effort to halt or even reverse this damage. In addition, unlike other more ambitious geoengineering projects, these ships can be simply turned off and their effects would vanish within a day or two. So I think there is very little danger of irrevocably damaging the climate.

At the very least it is refreshing to hear about a project that offers hope of a solution and actually has some chance of practical application.

Source articles:
http://inhabitat.com/2010/05/10/bill-gates-announces-funding-for-seawater-spraying-cloud-machines/
http://news.globaltv.com/world/Plans+cool+planet+heat+geoengineering+debate/3014922/story.html